Things people say and the way they say them....

Off-topic discussions about everything else
Keith
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Things people say and the way they say them....

Postby Keith » Tue Sep 14, 2010 4:47 am

I have pet peeve about the way people pronounce certain words. It bothers me because people have always misprounced and/or mispelled my last name and slough it off as no big deal. It's a big deal to ME! So I've grown sensitive to it all and I always try to pronounce and spell other people's names correctly as a result. It's made me hypersensitive to the way other words are being said.

One of the big ones that makes me role my eyes everytime I hear it, is the way certain regions of the U.S. pronounce the word "nuclear". George W Bush was constantly lampooned because he pronounce it as "newk-you-lar" instead of "newk-lee-ar". Come on people, get a clue, "newk-you-lar" makes you sound ignorant.

The next one that bugs me are the people that refer to the German automaker Porsche as "Porsh". It's "Porsh-ah" folks, the "e" is pronounced. I believe our German members will back me up on this one. I'm of German heritage myself and this one has always bothered me.

There is a local tv commercial for a small used car dealership in my area. The woman that owns the dealership does her own commercials (always a bad mistake by car dealers). She has a slight hispanic accent but not objectionable or intrusive and I have no complaint listening to her speak. However, at one point of the commercial her accent gets in the way of her english and the vehicle she is trying to sell, is a Toyota "Highlander" SUV. However, it comes out as "Toyota High-line-der" clear as a bell. Makes me cringe every time I hear it.

Over the years there have been others, but I can't recall them right now. Now I know regional pronunciations of words vary in most countries, but the ones above are examples of just pure ignorance or laziness that have grown into a habit.

I'm not going to point out things like "motor-sickle" vs "motor-sigh-kel" for motorcycle, or things like "pale" vs "bucket", "soda" vs "pop", "hamburg" vs "hamburger", and "frankfurter" vs "frankfurt" or "hot dog", as all these are correct words and are all just regional dialect variations.

So what obvious mispronunciations bug you? What bad pronunciations are like fingernails on a blackboard to you?
Last edited by Keith on Tue Sep 14, 2010 4:54 am, edited 2 times in total.

Zeal
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Postby Zeal » Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:19 pm

Regardless vs "Irregardless"... *cringes* :(

Amrine
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Postby Amrine » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:09 pm

Spelling bothers me more than pronunciation.

No offense Tinkerbell, but "R U ready for football" makes me cringe, Y u ask?

Wut do u mean u don't git it?

hehe Oh well, since we don't teach children how to spell effectively anymore I suppose it's the way it SHALL be.

Azeem
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Postby Azeem » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:14 pm

Teaching EFL, I'm not so much bothered by the regional variations of pronunciation than the insistence that there has to be one (and only one) form of "English," that being the Midwestern North American norm. As long as the person is able to communicate, that's pretty much good enough for me. "To[may]to" vs. "To[mah]to." Personally, I find the dialectical differences fascinating. As a friend said, "If everyone were the same, what a boring world this would be!"

Zeal
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Postby Zeal » Wed Sep 15, 2010 3:45 pm

"Amrine" wrote:Spelling bothers me more than pronunciation.


1t 1$ r34££¥ $4Ð wh3n ¥0µ $p3nÐ 4n h0µr tr¥1ng t0 r34Ð 4 $1ng£3 $3nt3n(3! :(

Tinkerbell
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Postby Tinkerbell » Wed Sep 15, 2010 4:17 pm

Spelling? OMG

I am the very worst typist on the planet & hold the forum record for edited posts to fix em!

...if you ever saw my Nile scrolls or wall posts you would know this is true...lol...<bows>...

Besides, I neva let English git in the weigh of a really kewl lookin or soundin wurd.

:D
Last edited by Tinkerbell on Wed Sep 15, 2010 4:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Keith
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Postby Keith » Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:27 pm

Yeah, this thread isn't so much about spelling. Most of that is just due to a lack of knowledge and not bothering to look it up or proofreading what you've typed...we're all lazy.

This is a thread about the way people actually say a word that is just flat wrong.

Zeal
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Postby Zeal » Wed Sep 15, 2010 6:06 pm

"Keith" wrote:This is a thread about the way people actually say a word that is just flat wrong.


|\/|¥ ƒ1r$7 3x4|\/|p£3 1$ $0|\/|37|-|1|\|9 1 |-|34r p30p£3 $4¥.

7|-|3¥ r34££¥ $4¥ 17!


7|-|3¥ r34££¥ $4¥ 17! :D

sakasiru
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Postby sakasiru » Thu Sep 16, 2010 9:51 am

"Keith" wrote:The next one that bugs me are the people that refer to the German automaker Porsche as "Porsh". It's "Porsh-ah" folks, the "e" is pronounced. I believe our German members will back me up on this one. I'm of German heritage myself and this one has always bothered me.



While you are of course correct here, I as a german don't bother that much about these things. I can imagine myself pronouncing foreign products horribly wrong all the time. It's not only being unfamiliar with the correct pronounciation, it's the difficulty in switching to a different "language melody" mid-sentence.
In german, we adapted a lot of english (or english-sounding) words. If you use them a lot, you nearly get a knot in your tongue f.e. by switching between the english "r" and the german one constantly.

If you understand german, this may amuse you...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHaW-KxA0sg

Amrine
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Postby Amrine » Thu Sep 16, 2010 1:26 pm

"Keith" wrote:Yeah, this thread isn't so much about spelling. Most of that is just due to a lack of knowledge and not bothering to look it up or proofreading what you've typed...we're all lazy.

This is a thread about the way people actually say a word that is just flat wrong.



Sorry about the derail, Keith. I say warsh instead of wash :(

Tinkerbell
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Postby Tinkerbell » Thu Sep 16, 2010 4:33 pm

No worries, Amrine. Thread hyjacking is a TM tradition!

:D

Keith
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Postby Keith » Thu Sep 16, 2010 5:25 pm

"sakasiru" wrote:While you are of course correct here, I as a german don't bother that much about these things. I can imagine myself pronouncing foreign products horribly wrong all the time. It's not only being unfamiliar with the correct pronounciation, it's the difficulty in switching to a different "language melody" mid-sentence.
In german, we adapted a lot of english (or english-sounding) words. If you use them a lot, you nearly get a knot in your tongue f.e. by switching between the english "r" and the german one constantly.

If you understand german, this may amuse you...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHaW-KxA0sg


However, it does bother me, which is the subject of the thread. Besides, "Porsche" is not that difficult for Americans to pronounce correctly.

Americans have more trouble with the German soft "ch" sound in German words like "ich". Many of them have a tendency for it come out as "ick". The German glotal rolling "r" sound gives a lot of them trouble too. I normally don't suffer from either of those two problems.

Meine Großeltern waren Deutsche. Sie wanderten aus Schleswig-Holstein im Jahr 1912. Großmutter begann, mir beizubringen, wenig Deutsch, wenn ich besuche sie jeden Tag benutzt. Sie stirbt, als ich jung war, so dass ich nicht sehr weit war. Meine Fähigkeit, lesen, schreiben und reden in Deutsch ist etwas schwach.

I have to rely on online translators to write and read long conversational replies to make sure I understand and respond.

Keith
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Postby Keith » Fri Sep 17, 2010 7:40 am

Ok, I've got a new one that bugs me. Lately there's been a new advertisement for AT&T high speed internet on tv. It starts with a kid talking about how he's fooling his mother doing his homework so fast on AT&T high speed internet and using the rest of the time to chat with friends. Mom is wise to the kid. She interupts his video chat with a video message of her own by offering him cookies and then tells him to say hello to his friends for her. The kid is stunned that mom is on to him.

Sounds normal. Except, the woman playing "mom" has a nasally tone that reminds me of someone that has a cold. But that's not it, the problem for me comes when she offers the "son" cookies. She has a odd way of pronouncing it that I've never heard before. Instead of "cook-ees" it comes across as "cook-iss".

Don't these people listen to these ads before they put them on the air? Evidently, not.

Oh, and it's election time in Illinois, and that infamous "Porsche" pronounciation appears in one of them as "porsh". Gack! I want to pummel the commercial narrator.

They are pointing out that one of the opposing candidates drives a Porsche, which, of course, automaticlaly makes him a bad guy in political-speak.

tomnobles
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Postby tomnobles » Thu Sep 23, 2010 2:26 pm

Good thing you can't hear my posts. My Texas accent would either upset you or scare you. :)

The German rock band "The Scorpions" don't seem to have a problem with English or other languages [ Wind of Change ] They were at the Ridgefield Amphitheater last month and so was I. :D

Herodotus
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Postby Herodotus » Fri Sep 24, 2010 9:41 am

"tomnobles" wrote:Good thing you can't hear my posts. My Texas accent would either upset you or scare you. :)


I say old bean, do you mean like this?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3C_wLCZ18M


(Rock on Tommy ;) )

tomnobles
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Postby tomnobles » Wed Oct 06, 2010 4:47 am

LOL, not quite but close.

Karter
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Postby Karter » Tue Oct 12, 2010 3:00 pm

"Keith" wrote:or things like "pale" vs "bucket"


Err, uhh, is it impolite to correct improper usage?

I almost turned ashen and 'pale' and spewed into the the garbage ' pail ' [bucket] when they pointed fingers at me.

:( OMG (opps, OH MY GOD) now I am in big doo-doo (opps DOG POOP)....

My diction is so horrid, I guess I am not too sensitive about such things. However, it does bother me that many children, now-a-days (slang for, now days), can't or don't know how to use cursive writing.
Studies, have shown that use of computers has lead to it's decline.

My ONLY pet peeve is the word " GOT "

When people say " I have got this, or, I have got that.

I was taught that using got with the word has and/or have in this manner, constituted a double negative, and proper use is "i have this" or "I have that" or "I got this" or "I got that". Used singular, but never together.

I have heard our last 2 presidents use the word GOT in this way. Heard news correspondents, tv commercials, and friends all use it in this manner.

Unless, the rules of proper grammar has changed for this word, I suppose it will make me cringe every time I hear it and drive me crazy for the rest of my life.

:)

Herodotus
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Postby Herodotus » Tue Oct 12, 2010 3:26 pm

"Karter" wrote:
Studies, have shown that use of computers has lead to it's decline.



0/10
D-

Oops! ;)

Keith
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Postby Keith » Tue Oct 12, 2010 4:30 pm

"Karter" wrote:Err, uhh, is it impolite to correct improper usage?

I almost turned ashen and 'pale' and spewed into the the garbage ' pail ' [bucket] when they pointed fingers at me.

:( OMG (opps, OH MY GOD) now I am in big doo-doo (opps DOG POOP)....


:)


I should have corrected that. :)

I'm more of a "bucket" person, so you can guess how often I have a chance to use the word "pail".

I have to say that I have said and do say "I've got it" stemming from old habits from childhood and organized baseball. The rules of grammar are just going to have to change eventually as the use becomes more and more common.


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